Daily readiness is the state of preparedness for exercise or training on a given day. Physical readiness and mental readiness are two important components of daily readiness.

There are many similar terms used for daily readiness in the field of exercise. Some examples are:

  • Athlete readiness
  • Training readiness
  • Exercise readiness
  • Workout readiness
  • Performance readiness

When you’re about to start a workout, it’s important to assess whether you or your athletes are able to meet the demands of this workout based on their readiness and recovery. If not, you may be exposing yourself or your athlete to unnecessarily high or even low training volumes which can potentially lead to injury.

This ties into what is termed the Supercompensation Theory. In a nutshell, this principle outlines how the body adapts to training stressors. If we do not give our athletes enough time to recover, their progress will plateau or even go backwards. This also occurs when we give them too much recovery and not enough training stimulus. Your FLEX device gives you objective data to decide when your athlete is ready for more or less training stimulus.  

https://sunnyhealthfitness.com/blogs/health-wellness/supercompensation-training-improve-workouts

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You can use your FLEX app to assess you or your athletes daily readiness. Coach Mash recommends the following:

  1. Conducting a Force Velocity Profile
  2. Monitoring %RM vs Velocities
  3. Measuring first set of the day at 80-85 1RM%

To assess daily readiness, you should first conduct a Force Velocity Profile of yourself or your athlete to determine their usual performance. Coach Mash runs through how to complete one of these using your FLEX device here.

From there, you can use these results to monitor whether or not your athlete is improving or going backwards. An athlete’s 1RM can vary 15% up or down, that means for example on any given day an athlete’s 80% 1RM can actually be anywhere between 65-95%. But we know from Dr Bryan Mann’s work that you or your athlete should be able to move 80% 1RM at around 0.5m/s.

  • Practical Example
    • After completing your force velocity profile, you know that 80 kg is your 80% 1RM for your back squat.
    • However due to 1RM varying 15% on any given day due to readiness this could be anywhere from 65-95kg.
    • If you wish to work at 80% 1RM for that given day you can get yourself or your athlete to work up to 80kg.
    • Once they have their FLEX device attached, this will tell them whether they are moving this weight faster or slower than 0.5m/s
    • If they are moving 80 kg faster than 0.5m/s, you may look to increase the weight until you are moving the load at around 0.5m/s
    • If they are moving 80 kg slower than 0.5m/s, you may look to decrease the weight until you are moving the load at around 0.5m/s

Finally, Coach Mash recommends that you or your athlete measure the first exercise of that day at 80-85% 1RM to determine your readiness. He makes the following recommendations based on the results:

  1. If the athlete is moving the load >5% faster than normal, prescribe an increase in volume and/or load for that day
  2. If the athlete is moving the load >5% slower than normal, prescribe a reduction in volume and/or load for that day
  3. If the athlete is moving the load >10% than normal, prescribe easy bodybuilding to elicit a helpful hormonal response